only-13-states-have-met-biden’s-goal-of-vaccinating-70%-of-adults

Only 13 states have met Biden’s goal of vaccinating 70% of adults

Spread the love
7 hr 25 min ago

Just 13 states have met Biden’s goal of vaccinating 70% of adults with at least one vaccine dose by July 4

From CNN’s Deidre McPhillips

People wait outside a mass coronavirus vaccination site in Hagerstown, Maryland, on April 7.
People wait outside a mass coronavirus vaccination site in Hagerstown, Maryland, on April 7. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Thirteen states have reached the Biden administration’s goal to vaccinate 70% of adults with at least one dose or coronavirus vaccine by July 4, according to data published Monday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Washington became the latest state to reach this threshold, joining California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont.

Overall, more than 171 million people – 51.6% of the total US population – have received at least one dose of Covid-19 vaccine, and nearly 140 million people – 42.1% of the population – are fully vaccinated, CDC data shows.

Among the eligible population of those 12 and older, nearly half are fully vaccinated.

Nearly 303 million doses of Covid-19 vaccine have been reported administered, about 82% of the 371.5 million doses delivered. That’s more than 1.2 million more doses reported administered since Sunday, for a seven-day average of about 1 million doses per day.

Note: Data published by the CDC may be delayed, and doses may not have been administered on the day reported.

8 hr 30 min ago

Around half of Americans support requiring proof of vaccination to return to work, poll finds

From CNN’s Naomi Thomas

A Covid-19 vaccination record card is pictured at a vaccination site in Tysons, Virginia, on April 19.
A Covid-19 vaccination record card is pictured at a vaccination site in Tysons, Virginia, on April 19. Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images

About 52% of Americans support requiring proof of vaccination to return to the workplace, according to a new AxiosIpsos poll published Tuesday. 

The results showed a political split: 76% of Democrats support showing vaccination status to return to work compared with 29% of Republicans, according to the poll, which was conducted June 4 to 7 and based on a nationally representative sample of 1,027 American adults. 

The poll also found that a majority of Americans support requiring vaccination and proof of vaccination to travel or attend a large event. 

Vaccination proof requirements were most strongly supported for travel, with 61% supporting for vacations at a hotel, resort or cruise ship, 64% for domestic flights and 67% for international flights. More than half – 56% – supported vaccination proof requirements for sporting events. 

There was less support for requiring proof of vaccination for activities like dining at a restaurant and shopping at retail stores, where 53% and 57% respectively were opposed. 

Vaccination requirements to go to a salon were supported by 49% of respondents. 

This is coming as 66% of those who took part in the poll reported being vaccinated. 7% of respondents said that they remained likely to get a vaccine and another 7% said that they were not likely to, but were not hard opposed. 

The number of respondents that said that they were not at all likely to get vaccinated – 19% – has stayed roughly the same since January. 

Looking at parents, 45% of respondents said that they were not very or not at all likely to get their child vaccinated and 15% said that they already had a vaccinated child. For parents of 12- to 17-year-olds – the youngest group currently eligible for vaccination – 30% said that their child was vaccinated and 40% said that they were not likely to vaccinate their child. 

8 hr 20 min ago

Tokyo 2020 consulting analysis says there will be limited impact on Covid-19 cases from games

Members of the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic organizing committee, including CEO of the committee, Muto Toshiro, third from right, attend a board meeting in Tokyo on June 8.
Members of the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic organizing committee, including CEO of the committee, Muto Toshiro, third from right, attend a board meeting in Tokyo on June 8. Kyodo News/Getty Images

Tokyo 2020 organizers are consulting models that show there will be limited impact by the Games on the Covid-19 situation in the country, Tokyo 2020 CEO Muto Toshiro told media.

Talking about examples of the analysis Tokyo 2020 is looking at, Muto told reporters: “If we assume 50% of 105,000 people related to the Games would visit from overseas, the calculation by Tokyo University’s Associate Prof. Nakata’s preliminary calculation is that it (Covid-19) will increase 15 new infection cases and 1 severe case. It says the impact of the visit of overseas athletes and people related to the Games will be limited. “

Masanori Takaya, spokesperson of Tokyo2020 also told media that there was little difference on the number of Covid-19 cases expected in Japan in running models for both holding games with spectators or canceling the games.

Tokyo 2020 says it will announce plans on spectators at the end of the month.

Muto also told reporters that nearly all of the doctors and nurses needed to hold the summer Olympics have been secured.

The CEO said 90% of doctors had been identified and 80% of nurses had been identified and that Tokyo 2020 was taking steps to accelerate recruitment to fully assign those positions by the end of the month.

8 hr 48 min ago

CDC study finds vaccinated people have milder disease in rare breakthrough infections

From CNN’s Maggie Fox

A pharmacist prepares the Pfizer vaccine at a pop-up vaccination clinic in New York on March 26.
A pharmacist prepares the Pfizer vaccine at a pop-up vaccination clinic in New York on March 26. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

People who have been vaccinated against coronavirus are more than 90% protected against infection and, if they do become infected, they have milder disease than unvaccinated people, a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study shows.

The ongoing, real-life study also shows even partially vaccinated people are 81% less likely to become infected than unvaccinated people, the CDC team reported.

The study of more than 3,900 health care staff, first responders and other frontline essential workers who have been tested weekly since December showed that so far 5% have tested positive for coronavirus. Only 16 of the 204 people who became infected had been vaccinated.

The findings are reported in an online preprint on the medrxiv site and have not been peer-reviewed or published in a medical journal.

“This adds to the growing body of real-world evidence of their effectiveness,” the CDC said in a statement.

“Findings from the extended timeframe of this study add to accumulating evidence that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are effective and should prevent most infections — but that fully vaccinated people who still get COVID-19 are likely to have milder, shorter illness and appear to be less likely to spread the virus to others. These benefits are another important reason to get vaccinated,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky added in the statement. 

The workers got either Pfizer/BioNTech’s or Moderna’s two-dose coronavirus vaccine and have been testing themselves weekly since December, regardless of whether they have symptoms. That’s the only way to tell if the vaccines prevent asymptomatic infections.

Those who got “breakthrough” infections after one or two doses of vaccine had 40% less virus in their bodies and were 58% less likely to have fever. They spent two fewer days in bed than unvaccinated Covid-19 patients.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *